A Heritage Restored  
  Introduction  
  1.5 Details of the Materials and Construction  
 
The Construction System

*(picture : Detail of window 2 and 3.)
*(source : Field Research)
*(picture : Detail of door 5.)
*(source : Field Research)
Windows and doors

There are 3 types of windows used in this house. One is used on the first floor and another two types are used on the ground floor as shown on the floor plan. All of the windows have a timber frame with timber panel window. The windows on upper floor is a full height windows with balustrades. Lattice work above the window provides for ventilation. There are many doors in the house. Basically, all doors are timber panel doors.
Staircases

There are two types of staircases in this house. The main staircase is located in front of the house gives access to the “Rumah Ibu” of the house. This staircase was made of brick, plaster and cement render as the finishes. Meanwhile, the secondary staircase is attached at the ‘Selang’ as a secondary access into the house especially for the female guests and as a private entrance. There is one more staircase at the back of the house. Both secondary staircases were made of timber with concrete padding.

*(picture : Detail of the secondary staircase)
*(Source : Field Research)
Floor

The floor components consist of beam, floor joist and timber planks which is the floor itself. The wooden floors were nailed to the floor joist. Gaps on the floor between the planks in certain areas of the house is to facilitate sweeping and washing that allows dirt and water to fall through to the ground.


a. The original structure of the walls
b. The wall structure of the addtional kitchen
The traditional Malay house is basically a post and lintel timber structure with a thatched gable roof. Here, the roof is made of clay tiles and was imported from India. The house is raised on stilts and rest on concrete or stone footings. No foundations are required since the house is a lightweight structure. The structural frame of the house consists of column braced by floor joists and roof girders. The main roof rests on the ridge supported by the column.

Walls

Overall, the building is constructed with timber plank painted yellow as its final finish. All the original structure of the house are made of solid timber. The walls are held by a ‘beroti’ and attached to the column. On the ground floor, the wall is encased by a one layer of 150mm thick brick in order to keep it in a good condition and last for a longer time.The kitchen ( at the back of the house), walls were built on 800mm height concrete wall similar to the modern traditional Malay houses today.


*(picture : The 'lapik tiang')

Columns

All of the columns were made of 140mm x 140mm hardwood with 420mm x 420mm x 150mm concrete and 260mm x 260mm x 180mm as a pad (lapik tiang)

Roof

As mentioned before, the roof form is “Bumbung Potongan Belanda”. The roof structure is all timber structure. The roof is tiled with clay tiles which was imported from India and held together with cement mortar. The timber trusses are connected using peg system tightened with bold and nuts.

*(picture : Detail of roof structure)
(Source : Field Research)
 
The History

Details of the “ Tunjuk Langit and the decorative fasia board.
The traditional Malay house is basically a post and lintel timber structure with a thatched gable roof. Here, the roof is made of clay tiles and was imported from India. The house is raised on stilts and rest on concrete or stone footings.No foundations are required since the house is a lightweight structure. The structural frame of the house consists of column braced by floor joists and roof girders. The main roof rests on the ridge supported by the column.

Planters’ House before the restoration at its original location

Planters’ House before the restoration

View taken from in front of Planters House
 
Pre Restoration
The Restoration Process
The Completed House